Recent Activity

  • commented on Chinatown - Provo Restaurant Review
  • commented on Central Square to Become Hotel
  • commented on Central Square to Become Hotel
  • commented on Central Square to Become Hotel
  • commented on Video of Maggots in Subway Sandwich In Provo Going Viral




What's Buzzing In Provo

    • 4
    Central Square to Become Hotel
    So today, as I was walking past Central Square, I decided to call the property manager to see how much they were selling it for. I was told that they closed on a deal last week, and that the building was going to be torn down and turned into office space, another parking structure, and a hotel.

    Thoughts?

      • 2
      James Harrow This must have been the hotel-that-must-not-be-named that was discussed at the event John Curtis held for business owners. Glad something is being done, right now it is a sore sight to look at. Can anybody get the scoop on the name of hotel going in? It seems John Curtis got in a little trouble last time a Provo Buzz user broke the news about At Home going in East Bay. Can we do it a second time?
      • 3
      Alex Whitt Oh I am on it :)
      • 1
      Zach Collier Haha. I love that we're a community of local whistleblowers.
    • 8 more comments
    • 4
    Video of Maggots in Subway Sandwich In Provo Going Viral
    Warning: The end of this video contains strong language. 

    A man pulled out his smartphone in a Provo, Utah Subway and started to film what appears to be maggots in his Subway sandwich as he talks to a Subway employee. The question is whether this video is real or not. Some people on Reddit aren't buying the story. One person on Reddit writes:

    "This is a setup. The veggies on the paper are fresh – the tomato is red and moist and the lettuce is green and crisp. THose are very late stage larva (look like gypsy moths to me) and in order to get that big, the veggies would have been so foul they’d look like a hot stew instead of freshly sliced. If the maggots were in the meat, it would have been slimy, and very warm to the touch. I think the guy is pulling a scam."

    Is this another poor couple in Provo trying to take advantage of the recent Jared Fogle news and pulling a scam? It's sad to say, but I know of a few people right here in Provo who have admitted to me or one of my friends that they have at least once tricked a restaurant into giving them free food by pulling things like this.

    What do you think?
      • 3
      Noah The employee completely mishandled this blatent setup.
      • 2
      Zach Collier I definitely think it's a setup. Nothing looks wrong with the sandwich. The only way that I could see this happening is if the night crew wasn't cleaning out the make line properly and bugs were growing underneath it - which would be terrible. But the lady totally mishandled it. You don't say, "If you don't stop freaking out you're not getting a refund." You refund that crap. FAST. haha
      • 2
      Alex Whitt Does nobody notice that the sandwich is like 80% gone? Seriously, who gets through the entire sandwich and then realizes their are worms? Bear Grylls would have slapped this kid and convinced him those worms were an added protein benefit.
    • 2 more comments
    • 5
    Can Provo Really "End" Homelessness?
    This past Monday Provo City held the "Mayor's Night at the Rec Center" where we helped fight homelessness by riding water sliders, chilling in hot tubs, enjoying an air conditioned building and eating endless amounts of food. But seriously, I applaud the efforts and really do think this is a great thing. Will it "end" homelessness like the goal is? Of course not, but $25,000 is better than $0 right?

    I do have a few questions if anybody has answers. I'm always weary of charities just because so many of them pocket a good chuck of the change. I'm curious about two things that would make me feel more comfortable donating:

    Who is deciding how the money will be used?
    The city kept that information very general by saying "The distribution of money will be decided by a panel of informed community members and case managers, so you can be assured that the money goes only to the deserving." I'd like to believe that, but based on some of the "informed" people the city is paying for consultation/advice I get nervous if I don't see actual names.

    What percentage of the money will actual go to fight homelessness?
    Even though these organizations are "non-profit" there is still a crap load of profit going on internally. I know several president's of charities here in Utah who make six-figure incomes through their charities. Is there public information on how much of my dollar will go to the actual cause? I've seen some charities like this take upwards of 70% of each dollar to cover "costs" before it even gets to the cause.
      • 1
      Steve This doesn't answer your question but this is a TED talk that changed the way I think about charities.
      I used to think about it more how you have explained in your post.
      http://on.ted.com/Pallotta
    • 4
    One of the best Provo music venues is set for a most triumphant return
    When Muse Music closed their doors last year they promised a quick return and it appears that they are delivering. I saw this sign today and checked out the new website.
    "Muse Music has a new home!
    247 W Center St, Provo
    We re-open on 9.11.15
    with
    Van Lady Love
    MiNX
    Static Waves"

    Visit musemusicprovo.com to sign up for email updates.
    • 8
    Why Most Provo Residents Just Don't Give a Damn About Elections
    I've been reading a lot of articles from the local media about Provo's pathetic voter turnout. The last numbers I read showed that 7% of residents actually voted this past week. Why is that? Many of the comments I read on these articles as well as on social media tend to chastise the residents. Is it really our fault? I didn't vote, and I'll tell you why I don't plan to until the problem is fixed.

    The personal dilemma I face is that I don't want to vote in the wrong person. I feel that way because I honestly can't find out what each candidates true agenda is. Even when "researching" the candidates, I can't make a decision. Let me summarize what every candidate stands for:

    • They love Provo.
    • They have a family and want to live here.
    • They want to improve education.
    • They want to lower taxes.
    • They want to make Provo more business friendly.
    • They want to keep Provo's "momentum" going.
    • They love Provo.

    Put simply, Provo elections are about as informative as high school elections. Candidates stick to fluffy "feel good" answers and never actually discuss details. And why should they? The local media does a crappy job at forcing these candidates to talk about real issues our cities face. Daily Herald, where the hell are you guys? You can spend all night reporting election results but you can't throw together a simple debate between the candidates? You can't pull candidates in and question them on real issues? Force them to stand out and answer for their past voting record?

    Until we have an election with candidates talking about real issues (and a real media company who's willing to ask hard questions) like solving panhandling/homelessness, attracting more retail to Provo, keeping the growing tech companies in our city, paying for the expensive Rec Center that our leaders pushed through, you won't have my vote. I know each candidate has a plan in their mind, but why run the risk of losing votes when you can just run social ads and win a popularity contest?
      • 3
      Rachel Whipple You clearly don't know anything about any of the candidates if you think your bullet point list applies to all of the candidates. I met all of them for Citywide, District 3 and District 5, and even hosted an event where anyone interested could come and hear the candidates responses to those and other questions on "real issues." I passed out 16,000 flyers in my neighborhood inviting people to attend. We had fewer than 50 people show up, including the candidates. I absolutely think the appalling low voter turnout is the fault of our many residents who didn't bother to become informed and vote, but their lack of engagement (as typified by the OP author) just makes my vote count for that much more. To blame others for your shoddy "research" (it is good you put "researching" in quotes, because you obviously didn't do any real research) and lack of engagement is puerile at best. Do you seriously think that interviews run by the Daily Herald would be more substantive than the video interviews of the candidates available through the city's website? Please.

      You say you won't vote until the problem is fixed. I think that's true. But you don't seem to realize that you are part of the problem, and you have the means to fix it yourself. Nobody's going to do it for you. Rather than apologize for you unpatriotic lack of engagement or resolve to step up and demand real information on your own, I'm sure you'll just keep blaming anyone and everyone else.
      • 2
      Marc Steed Alex, why don't you be the catalyst for the change you write about? Give the city council candidates an invitation to come to your house, invite some friends, and have a great time peeling away the layers of similarity to find the differences you seek. I promise you won't be disappointed.
      • 4
      Alex Whitt I appreciate the replies from both @Rachel Whipple and @Marc Steed. I'm not arguing that efforts haven't been made to better educate the public, it's just that the efforts aren't effective. As much as I love politics, I would never in a million years go to someone's house to discuss local candidates. That only draws in a very very small (and usually older) crowd that enjoys that type of political interaction. I'm a millennial, if the information isn't online, I don't know about it. We have events such as the one Rachel threw, I see events from the "Our Provo" group but the problem is these types of events just are not attractive to the general public. Imagine if the media both left and right didn't cover the Presidential elections, we would know virtually nothing about the candidates or what is going on. Not only does the media cover the elections, but they ask hard questions on a daily basis. "Candidate X, you say you stand for this, but what specifically would you do to make that happen?" "Candidate B, you mentioned last week on your blog that you are trying to stop X yet your voting record shows that you've been supporting it for the past 5 years. How do you explain that?" This are the questions that need to be asked. I know you will argue that if I attended this old fashioned get togethers that I just may hear the answers, but this stuff NEEDS to be online. Provo is a young tech city and uses the internet more than any other city in America, so why on earth are we still trying to put together offline events and cater towards the 60+ audience?

      Those city videos, while a step in the right direction, where nothing but a bunch of softball questions thrown towards the candidates. The city did the best they could. It's not their job to ask the hard questions because that is not what we pay them to do. Local media like The Herald has the time and audience to accomplish what all of us can't. Now, knowing the Herald I can sadly say that they will never do that, simply because they are bound by advertisers, many of whom are tied directly to city officials and candidates. Perhaps I could propose @Provo Buzz do something next election? This seems like the only platform that isn't tied to advertisers and really has nothing to lose in this situation.
    • 7 more comments
    • 3
    BYU Football Is Now Data Mining For Wins
    Zach Knowlton teams with BYU football for some hard-hitting statistical research
    • 3
    What is the vibe for non-LDS people living in Provo/Orem?
    I'm currently living in Seattle and considering taking a position at a tech company in Provo, but was wanting to find out more about life for non-Mormon's in your city. I'm Christian, and know some very nice Mormon's here in Seattle but I'm sure it's different going to an LDS dominated area.

    I'm single, 32, and hoping to create some real relationships and have a quality dating life and have no intention of becoming a Mormon. Any insights you locals have would be great! I just don't want to move to a place where I won't be accepted.
      • 1
      Alex Whitt Quality of life is great here regardless of whether you are Mormon or not. I will be the first to say that even 32-year-old guys here who are LDS have a hard time dating/getting married. You have an uphill battle as being a non-Mormon will certainly be a tough pill for many Mormon girls to swallow. Are their non-Mormon singles in the area? Sure, but you don't exactly run into them everyday like you would a Mormon.
      • 3
      Cade Ekblad-Frank I'm in a similar boat: non-Mormon, 32, single, and working in tech. I moved here about a decade ago. Over the years, I've moved back and forth between SLC and Provo several times. In general, I'd recommend moving to SLC over Provo as it will likely better mesh with what you're used to in Seattle.

      The area is pretty compact; Downtown SLC is only 45 minutes from Provo by car. Most of the tech companies are located in Lehi/Draper at the mid-point between SLC and Provo. Typical commutes are in the 25-45 minute range depending on the mode (car, commuter train, etc) from either. If the company is actually in Provo, don't be surprised if they re-locate to Lehi/Draper in the near future.

      In my experience, Utah Mormons are like your local Mormons turned up to 11. There is a distinct and dominant Mormon influence on local culture. Liquor laws are restrictive (occasionally absurd) and take some getting used to. Most shops and restaurants are closed Sunday. There are social taboos that might surprise you. I've found that the member/non-member communities silo themselves in Utah County, sometimes to the effect of "us vs. them." First encounters with new people usually have an aspect of feeling out whether the other is a member. I've never quite gotten used to it.

      Dating can be challenging. The "dateable" pool is quite constricted, especially in Utah County, by simple math— non-Mormons occupy only a small sliver of the total population. I've personally found dating Utah Mormons untenable as our values don't align, but obviously, your mileage may vary. SLC is more metropolitan with a bit more normal (though still heavily Mormon) population distribution. Most of my personal dating happens in SLC.

      I currently live in Provo, but am in the process of moving back to SLC.

      Side note: Having worked in tech here for quite some time, I can probably dish on (possibly intimately) the company you are considering. Feel free to email my first name at e-f.me if that strikes your fancy.
      • 2
      Zach Collier My buddy just moved here from Seattle (he just graduated from U dub). He moved down to drum for my band for the summer and liked the music scene and how nice everyone was so much that he extended for another year and put off grad school. A lot of job opportunities, a lot of startup companies, a good culture - but it's definitely a college town, which has a lot to do with why dating can be restrictive and difficult here. At 32, you probably won't be interested in the things my 23 year old friend is. But as a Catholic, he hasn't had any issues that I am aware of, and we see each other every day.
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